Articles Tagged with wrong patient surgery

The American Academy of Pediatrics has issued a Policy Statement titled "Guidelines for Expert Testimony in Medical Malpractice Litigation.  

After reviewing the role of the expert witness in medical malpractice litigation, the Guidelines begin the "recommendations" section of the paper with this statement:

The AAP recognizes that physicians have the professional, ethical, and legal duty to testify as called on in a court of law in accordance with their expertise. Physicians serving as expert witnesses have an obligation to present complete and unbiased information with which the trier of fact can ascertain whether the defendant was medically negligent and whether, as a result, the plaintiff suffered compensable

Here is the most up-to-date data on medical malpractice case filings in Tennessee.

Regular readers know that  effective October 1, 2008 the General Assembly imposed significant restrictions on patients who want to file a medical malpractice suits.  The new law, which was modified again effective July 1, 2009, requires pre-suit notice and the filing of a certificate of good faith.

For the 12-month period ending September 30, 2008, 644  medical malpractice lawsuits were filed in Tennessee.   A whooping 140 of those were filed in September 2008 as lawyers filed suits to avoid the burden and risks of filing cases under the new law.  If September 2008 were an average month, one would have expected only 45 cases to have been filed.

HeathGrades studies Medicare patient care in our nation’s hospitals based on 15 indicators of patient safety.   

Here are some highlights from the 2009 report representing data from 2005 -2007:

· There were 913,215 total patient safety events among 864,765 Medicare beneficiarieswhich represents 2.3 percent of the nearly 38 million Medicare hospitalizations.

You know that patient safety is not a priority in a hospital when your state regulatory agency orders that cameras be installed in your operating rooms.

Rhode Island Hospital has had five wrong-site surgeries since 2007.  Here is how the AP described the last incident:

The latest incident last month involved a patient who was to have surgery on two fingers. Instead, the surgeon performed both operations on the same finger. Under protocols adopted in the medical field, the surgery site should have been marked and the surgical team should have taken a timeout before cutting to ensure they were operating on the right patient, the right part of the patient’s body and doing the correct procedure.

The Commercial Appeal wrote an interesting story on medical malpractice litigation in today’s paper.  Read it here.

An excerpt:

Nationwide, the number of payments physicians made for malpractice claims fell to 11,037 last year — the lowest figure since the National Practitioner Data Bank began tracking data in 1990. Adjusted for inflation, the total $3.6 billion they paid was the second-lowest sum on record.

Every day, more than  5 Tennesseans die as a result of medical malpractice.

How do I know such a thing?  Simple math.  The Institute of Medicine has reported that 98,000 people a year die from medical malpractice.  Think about it:  the death rate from medical malpractice  is the equivalent of a large commercial airline crash every day that results in the death of 268 people.

The USA has about 300,000,000 people.  Tennessee has about 6,000,000 citizens, or 2% of the total.  Assuming that the rate of medical errors that result in death in Tennessee is no better and no worse than anywhere else in the country,  1960 Tennesseans die every year as a result of medical malpractice (2% x 98,000).  And that works out to 163 people per month.  That is the equivalent of a commuter jet crash in Tennessee every week that results in the death of about 40 people.

A couple of months ago I filed an application  with the American  Board of Professional Liability Attorneys seeking  board certification in medical malpractice cases.  I have been board certified as a civil trial specialist for over 15 years.   In fact, several years ago I served as President of the National Board of Trial Advocacy, the group that certifies civil trial specialists. 

For those of you who want to seek certification, here are the criteria:

  • Be in good standing with your State Bar;
  • Provide a writing sample, either trial memorandum or brief;
  • Pass EBOLA’s written examination in either Legal or Medical Professional Liability;
  • Have spent at least the last 5 years practicing in Legal or Medical Professional Liability;
  • In the last 3 years, have dedicated at least 25% of your professional time to  Medical Professional Liability;
  • In the last 3 years, have completed a minimum of 36 hours of continuing legal education (CALE) in  Medical Professional Liability, or met the CALE requirements of your State Bar, whichever is greater; and
  • Provide 6 references: 3 judges and 3 attorneys who practice in Legal or Medical Professional Liability.

I have to confess I was a little nervous about the examination.  I haven’t taken a test for over 15 years and had no idea what to expect.  I was told it was impossible to study for the test, and that advice was correct.  The test was at least 50% medicine and the breadth of the subjects covered made studying impractical if not impossible..  I received a break – one series of questions dealt with a medical subject on a case I tried in 2008.

The Washington Supreme Court has struck down the filing of a certificate of merit in medical malpractice cases in Washington state.   The certificate is required by RCW 7.70.150.

The opinion said that the statute was unconstitutional because it violated the separation of powers between the Legislature and the Judiciary and it denied medical malpractice victims equal access to the courts. 

The Court said that

The Georgia Legislature imposed a cap on noneconomic damages in meritorious medical malpractice cases in 2005.   The cap is $350,000.   In a case tried in Fulton County several years ago, the jury’s verdict exceeded the cap, and the Georgia Supreme Court is now considering whether the cap is constitutional.

According to a press release from the Georgia Trial Lawyers Association and re-printed on the Atlanta Injury Lawyer Blog

“Betty Nestlehutt was the face of her real estate business,” said Malone. “Her face was so horrifically disfigured that she was no longer able to even leave her house. Photographs of her disfigurement are even too gruesome for public distribution. The damage is permanent. Years later she has to wear layers of special makeup to try to give the appearance of normalcy.”

A reader sent me an article in September – October 2009 issue of Harvard Magazine  that discusses the work of Dr. Atul Gawande.   Dr. Gawande is very interested in patient safety.  One of his interests is the use of medical checklists, a subject I have addressed in a previous post.

Apparently,  Gawande and his colleagues developed a checklist for surgery patients.  The list, described in the article as addressing "rudimentary tasks" (e.g. confirming the patient’s identity), had some amazing results.  In one year of use in 8 different hospitals around the world, the rate of complications had dropped one-third; surgicial-site infections by half, and deaths of surgical patients by nearly half.

Seven countries and more than two dozen states require the use of surgical checklists.  One wonders why every state in the Union does not require them.